SCRATCH GAME DESIGN

Try my Scratch game below. What do you like about it? What do you think needs improving?

New to Scratch programming? Try these useful tutorial cards.

TIP: think of a game that you like playing in real life, or on the Scratch community. Use this as a format for your game, Here’s some ideas:

  • Pong
  • Super Mario
  • Maze
  • Memory cards
  • War/battle
  • racing car
  • Choose your own adventure

Emoji and Graffiti

Combine the power of emoji with graffiti to create speech bubbles on these images. Stick to the theme: migration.

Choose an image from this slide show:

TIP: Insert your chosen image into a Word document. Add a ‘callout’ shape. type your emojis inside the callout shape – no more than 5 emoji per shape. Here’s my example:

emoji graffiti example

Upload your file into the Activity space in Seesaw.

 

APP DESIGN

Would you like to build a web-based app to help our community members improve the management of their waste?  Here are some tips and resources.

Check out Ms Lockyer’s app.

TIP 1:

Spend time on your planning. The most important consideration is WHY are we designing this app, along with WHAT ACTION do we want our audience to take after using the app?

TIP 2:

Here’s a useful document to help you plan: app plan for waste inquiry based on the Techgirls Are Superheroes app designing competition.

TIP 3:

We will be using the resources on Code-org to build our app, specifially AppLab. Here’s a link to their privacy policy for our students’ protection. You might like to read it with your parents. We are using AppLab under a teacher-membership/online classroom arrangement and you will receive a login card for this.

Garage Band

Garage Band on the iPad is a fabulous tool for creating your own music which you can use with integrity in any of your own multimedia projects.

TIPS:

  1. Find a classmate who is an expert in Garage Band. Ask them to be your GB Buddy.
  2. Watch this YouTube clip:

3. Think LOOPS! These are patterns of music that can be joined together to create a catchy song.

4. Aim to create on the iPad as quickly as possible – they are not always available. Keep a note on which iPad you are using.

5. When you are happy with your tune, get it onto your PC. Try emailing it to your PC. (this might take a few minutes, so be patient.) This guide is useful.

6. Plan B for getting your Garage Band song onto your PC: airdrop the song to your teacher’s iPad. They can then send it to you via email OR OneDrive.

Once you have received your song on your PC, use Audacity to make changes, including putting it in a format which suits your project. You will need an extra bit of software called a LAME Encoder. This can be downloaded onto your PC from here.