Think Like a Geographer

We are learning to think like a geographer when comparing global locations. We are learning about importance of environments to people in three global locations, and how they protect their special places. 

PART 1: DRYANDRA FOREST

Which words might a geographer use to describe the Dyrandra Forest?  Choose your top 5 words from the list:

salinity wheatbelt woodlands outcrop cleared granite farming sanctuary fences plateau wandoo semi-arid south-west mallet baiting endangered conservation undulating council species population plain climate phascogale quenda forest protected reserve crop

Go to Menti

Use this code: 47 08 66 and add in your top 5 words.

PART 2: POLAR PARK, NORWAY

Watch the clips and read the texts. Use Menti to suggest words we might use as geographers to describe the Polar Park in Norway.

Use this code: 47 08 66 and add in your top 5 words.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rohkunborri_National_Park

https://www.revolvy.com/page/Rohkunborri-National-Park?stype=videos

PART 3: THE QUIVER FOREST

Watch the clips. Start thinking about which geographical vocabulary we might use to describe the Quiver Forest.

 

MOVING DESIGNS

PROBLEM A: How might we make a cup-and-ball toy for our buddies?

Consideration: Ms Lockyer bought the Venom Kendama toy for her grandchildren. She found out the hard way that it was a bit on the dangerous side for them!

TASK 1:

Leave a comment here if you would like to share any design tips to help us all ‘Level Up.’

Task 2:

Check out the slide show of crafty cup-and-ball designs. Leave a comment after watching about how you might change your design.

PROBLEM B: How might we encourage people to use the vertical LEGO cube?

Consideration: Ms Lockyer designed the LEGO cube for Propeller. Nobody has tried out the vertical faces for LEGO building yet!

TASK 1: 

Can you think of any interesting ways how we might promote the LEGO cube?

TASK 2:

Coming soon…

 

The Batavia Mutiny

We are learning about an event in Western Australian history. We are learning to think deeper about events in the past.

Task 1: Socrative

Take the Socrative quiz. use the Socrative Student app, or the Socrative website.

Enter our room number: 57344

 

TASK 2: Watch these 2 clips and post a comment on this blog:

  • I wondering…
  • It’s bugging me that…
  • I noticed that…

Batavia Mutiny clip

Batavia Shipwreck clip

 

 

 

BREAKOUT NO. 2

YOUR BREAKOUT MISSION:

Fish: dangerous or endangered? Follow these clues to unlock the box.

CLUE 1:

Find the sketch of the Indigenous fish trap in a river bed, drawn by a white settler in WA. Around what year was this drawing done?

CLUE 2:

Indigenous man Harley is part of the Great Southern Festival, giving talks about indigenous culture. He knows a lot about traditional Indigenous fishing practices. He also knows a lot about fishing in his local estuary. Which of these factors has affected fishing in the estuary the most? TIP: Check out the videos from our first blog-based lesson on fishing. Listen for something:  it’s a 5-letter word in one of these:.

  • clear the land
  • hotel building
  • board walk has been developed on the foreshore
  • shark infestation

 

CLUE 3:

Which type of fish would have been caught in the Brewarrina fish trap?

Choose from:

  1. Sand whiting 531
  2. Yellowbelly 106
  3. Barramundi 526
  4. Garfish 299

 

CLUE 4:

A Western Australian author wrote a book called ‘Blueback’. Which type of fish was Blueback?

 

 

 

CLUE 5:

Read this article.

What is the one out of these words? One of them has nothing to do with the article.

PIRATES

SUSTAINABILITY

TERRITORY

ICEBERG